Wills

Will Information

Why should you make a Will?

It has been said that there are two certainties in life: death and taxes. It is also true that both can make their demands on young and old alike. Death does not call by convenient appointment: by writing your will and therefore always ensuring that your plans are up-to-date you can be confident that, whatever lies around the corner, you have done your best to safeguard the future of those you love, and who trust you to do your best for them.

It is the only way to ensure that your personal wishes are carried out after your death. If you have not made a Will, your estate will pass according to the Law of Intestacy - effectively, the State will write a Will for you on your death, and the terms may be very far from what you would have wanted. Meanwhile it is your nearest and dearest who would face the rigours of going through this bureaucratic procedure: at the very time such troubles are least wanted. No one likes State interference in their personal affairs while they are alive: why have it on death?

If you are married, contrary to the belief still all too commonly held, despite the large amount of publicity nowadays regularly given to the actual position by all the news media: a surviving spouse does not necessarily automatically inherit everything, and argument and dispute within the family is likely without a Will.

If you are co-habiting but not married, your surviving partner may receive nothing and may lose their home.

If you have children, your main consideration is the appointment of legally valid guardians in your Will in case both married parents die. If parents are not married and the mother wishes the father to have care should she die, then it may be that she will need to appoint him as first guardian, as he may not always automatically have parental responsibility in law. If guardians are not appointed, then the Court will decide who has care of your children, and this may be someone you would not have wished. If the process through the court is protracted, children may be temporarily taken into Social Services care.

If your surviving spouse re-marries, their new spouse would inherit on their death rather than your children. This can occur even without your spouse intending it to. Provision can be made in a Will to alleviate this potential problem.

A Will can take into account several external factors that might otherwise adversely affect the amount of estate passing to beneficiaries: for example, the Community Care Act 1990 and Inheritance Tax.

Our professional Will drafting service alleviates these and other potential problems, giving you and your family peace of mind and confidence in your future.

Who should make a Will?

Really, all adults should. Certainly married couples and, even more importantly, co-habiting partners. A will is absolutely vital, for several reasons, if you have young children, especially if any are from a previous relationship.

At what age should you make a Will

Wills are not about age - they are about responsibility, and younger people usually have more responsibilities, especially if they have children. You are not, as some superstitiously think "tempting fate".

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Why should I make a Will?

Really, all adults should. Certainly married couples and, even more importantly, co-habiting partners. A will is absolutely vital, for several reasons, if you have young children, especially if any are from a previous relationship.

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Our Will Service

At the first appointment we advise you, discuss your requirements and take your instructions for the actual preparation of your Wills. In one of our two offices or, at no additional cost to you...

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